Contact Lens Correction

There are many options to choose from when considering contact lenses. We can help you decide what will work best for you based on your needs and your lifestyle. Because contact lenses move with your eye, they allow a natural field of view and generally offer better sight. They have no frames to obstruct your vision and do not fog up or get splashed by mud or rain - good news if you engage in sports or are an outdoor enthusiast.

Bear in mind that if you are considering contact lenses over glasses you will require a longer initial examination, and more time for lens care. You will need to clean and store lenses carefully, follow lens wearing schedules and have regular appointments for follow-up care.

The following outlines the advantages & disadvantages of each type of contact lens available.

 

Rigid gas-permeable (RGP)

Rigid gas-permeable (RGP) is made of slightly flexible plastic that allows oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

Advantages:

  • Excellent vision. Short adaptation period. Comfortable to wear. Correct most vision problems. Easy to put on and to care for. Durable with a relatively long life.
  • Available in tints (for handling purposes) and bifocals.

Disadvantages:

  • Require consistent wear to maintain adaptation. Can slip off center of eye more easily than other types. Debris can easily get under the lenses.
  • Require office visits for follow-up care.

Daily-wear soft lenses

Daily-wear soft lenses are made of soft, flexible plastic that allows oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

Advantages:

  • Very short adaptation period. More comfortable and more difficult to dislodge than RGP lenses.
  • Available in tints and bifocals. Great for active lifestyles.

Disadvantages:

  • Require consistent wear to maintain adaptation. Can slip off center of eye more easily than other types. Debris can easily get under the lenses.
  • Require office visits for follow-up care.

Extended-wear lenses

Extended-wear lenses are available in soft or RGP lenses.

Advantages:

  • Can usually be worn up to seven days without removal.

Disadvantages:

  • Do not correct all vision problems.
  • Require regular office visits for follow-up care.
  • Increased risk of complication.

Extended-wear disposables

Extended-wear disposables are soft lenses that can be worn for one to six days before being discarded.

Advantages:

  • Require little or no cleaning.
  • Minimal risk of eye infection if wearing instructions are followed.
  • Available in tints and bifocals.
  • Spare lenses are available.

Disadvantages:

  • Vision may not be as sharp as RGP lenses.
  • Do not correct all vision problems.
  • Handling may be more difficult.

Planned replacement lenses

Planned replacement lenses are soft daily wear lenses that are replaced on a planned schedule, most often every two weeks, monthly, or quarterly.

Advantages:

  • Require simplified cleaning and disinfection.
  • Good for eye health.
  • Available in most prescriptions.

Disadvantages:

  • Vision may not be as sharp as RGP lenses.
  • Do not correct all vision problems.
  • Handling may be more difficult.

Adapted from table provided by American Optometric Association

 

 

No matter which contact lens you decide to use, please follow the following guidelines:

  1. Always wash your hands before handling your contact lenses.
  2. Carefully and regularly clean your lenses. Rub them with your fingers and rinse them thoroughly before soaking overnight in multi-purpose solution. Make sure you use enough solution to completely cover the lens.
  3. Store your lenses in the proper lens storage case and replace the case at a minimum of every three months. Clean the case after each use, and keep it open and dry between cleanings.
  4. Use only recommended products recommended for cleaning and disinfecting your lenses. Saline solution and rewetting drops are not designed to disinfect lenses.
  5. Only fresh solution should be used to clean and store contact lenses. Never re-use old solution. Contact lens solution must be changed according to the manufacturer's recommendations, even if the lenses are not used daily.
  6. Always follow the recommended contact lens replacement schedule prescribed by your optometrist.
  7. Remove your contact lenses before swimming or entering a hot tub.
  8. See your optometrist for your regularly scheduled contact lens and eye examination.